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Having a tagging and tracking solution for your tools can help reduce loss and theft on site, keep a general inventory for re-orders and help you find what you need, when you need it. On top of that, making sure you’re successfully capturing data in extreme environments means needing a robust, reliable solution. Metalcraft is known for our products’ durability in the harshest of conditions—from high temperatures to abrasive/heavy impact situations, we have tool tracking solutions to stand up to whatever you (literally) throw at it. Now that’s ID Made Better®.

A versatile and affordable RFID tag made in the USA to fit a wide array of on-metal and standard applications, the Universal MC RFID Tag is available both preprinted and onsite printable to handle whatever asset tagging application you have.

The perfect solution for tracking assets on metal or non-metal surfaces that do not allow for attachment directly to the asset. The construction protects the inlay from environmental conditions that could affect the performance of the RFID tag.

Perfect for tracking returnable containers such as pallets, crates or totes, Metalcraft’s Standard RFID Tag attaches directly to non-metal assets.

The only thing “mini” about this tag is its size! With a smaller footprint and lower profile, the Onsite Printable Universal Mini RFID Tag easily fits where other tags may be too large and obtrusive and still gives incredible read ranges compared to other tags in its class.

The Universal Micro RFID Tag measuring 1 7/8” x 5/8” is a great solution to your identification projects that require the smallest RFID tag with great read range.

If you are looking for a small RFID tag, the Universal Mini RFID Tag is the one for you! The Universal Mini RFID Tag may be small in size, but it packs a powerful punch! Its compact design and slim profile make it ideal for spaces where larger tags would be cumbersome.

 

What is RFID tool tracking?

RFID tool tracking refers to the use of RFID (Radio-Frequency Identification) technology to monitor and manage tools within various industries. This system involves tagging tools with RFID tags containing unique identifiers and using RFID readers to capture data from these tags. Here's a breakdown of how RFID tool tracking typically works:

  1. Tagging Tools: Each tool is equipped with an RFID tag, which can come in various forms such as adhesive labels, hard tags, or embedded tags. These RFID tags contain unique identification numbers or codes that are associated with specific tools in a database.

  2. RFID Readers: RFID readers are installed at strategic locations where tool tracking is required, such as entry/exit points, tool cribs, or workstations. These readers emit radio waves and are capable of detecting RFID tags within their read range.

  3. Data Capture: As a tool with an RFID tag passes within the read range of an RFID reader, the reader captures the unique identifier of the RFID tag associated with the tool. This information is then transmitted to a central database or software system in real-time or near real-time.

  4. Database Integration: The captured data, including the unique identifiers of RFID tags and corresponding tool information, is integrated into a central database or tool management software. This database typically contains details such as the tool type, serial number, maintenance history, location, and current status.

  5. Real-Time Tracking: RFID technology enables real-time tracking of tools as they move within the vicinity of RFID readers. This provides visibility into the location and movement of tools, allowing organizations to efficiently manage tool inventory, prevent loss or theft, and optimize tool utilization.

  6. Automated Processes: RFID tool tracking systems often include automated processes to streamline workflows and improve efficiency. For example, automated alerts can be set up to notify personnel when tools are moved outside designated areas, require maintenance, or are due for calibration based on predefined criteria.

  7. Integration with Existing Systems: RFID tool tracking systems can be integrated with existing enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, maintenance management systems, or inventory management systems. This integration facilitates seamless data exchange and allows organizations to leverage RFID data alongside other business-critical information.

  8. Security Features: RFID tool tracking systems may incorporate security features such as access control, which restricts access to tools based on user permissions. Employees may be required to authenticate themselves using RFID-enabled badges or credentials before accessing certain tools or equipment.

Overall, RFID tool tracking provides organizations with an efficient and automated solution for managing tool inventory, enhancing asset visibility, and improving operational efficiency across various industries.

How do you use RFID for tool tracking?

RFID (Radio-Frequency Identification) technology offers an efficient and automated means of tracking tools in various industries, including manufacturing, construction, healthcare, and maintenance. Here's a general overview of how RFID can be utilized for tool tracking:

  1. Tagging Tools: Each tool is affixed with an RFID tag. These tags can come in various forms, such as adhesive labels, hard tags, or embedded tags. The RFID tags contain a unique identifier that can be associated with specific tools in a database.

  2. Reader Infrastructure: RFID readers are strategically placed in key locations where tool tracking is required. These readers emit radio waves and detect RFID tags within their range.

  3. Data Capture: As a tool with an RFID tag comes within the read range of a reader, the reader captures the tag's unique identifier. This information is then transmitted to a central database or software system.

  4. Database Integration: The captured data is integrated into a database or tool management software. Each RFID tag's unique identifier is linked to relevant information about the corresponding tool, such as its type, serial number, maintenance history, and location.

  5. Real-Time Tracking: RFID enables real-time tracking of tools as they move within the read range of RFID readers. This provides visibility into the whereabouts of tools, allowing for efficient inventory management and asset utilization.

  6. Automation and Alerts: RFID technology enables automation of various processes related to tool tracking. For example, automated alerts can be set up to notify managers when tools are moved outside designated areas or require maintenance based on usage patterns.

  7. Integration with Existing Systems: RFID systems can often be integrated with existing enterprise resource planning (ERP) or maintenance management systems, streamlining workflows and ensuring seamless data exchange.

  8. Mobile Applications: Some RFID systems offer mobile applications that allow users to track tools using smartphones or tablets. This enables on-the-go access to tool tracking information and facilitates field operations.

  9. Security and Authentication: RFID technology can also enhance security by restricting access to tools based on user permissions. Employees may be required to authenticate themselves using RFID-enabled badges or credentials before accessing certain tools or equipment.

Overall, RFID technology provides a robust solution for tool tracking, offering efficiency, accuracy, and real-time visibility into tool inventory and usage.

From The Asset Tracking Blog

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